London was awash in festivities on Queen Elizabeth’s coronation day

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London was awash in festivities on Queen Elizabeth’s coronation day

Queen Elizabeth is celebrating her Platinum Jubilee this week, with celebrations taking place across the UK. The coronation of Queen Elizabeth II took place in 1953, and on that day people reveled in the festivities. In this episode, two witnesses of history who were his companions during the inauguration ceremony recount this historic day.

June 2, 1953. All eyes were on London that day. This city is shaking with happiness, joy and excitement. Not just in London, but across the Commonwealth, all eyes were on this event.

The weather was a bit chilly this June morning, but the rain that had fallen that morning had stopped, and there was a glimmer of hope that the sun might appear in the sky.

The Queen will travel from her London residence to Buckingham Palace to attend the unveiling ceremony. From there he will travel to Westminster Abbey, where his coronation will be completed. On that day, every building in the city was covered in inauguration decorations, except for the eastern facade of Buckingham Palace.


When the Queen left Buckingham Palace for Westminster Abbey, six young women were chosen to accompany her as escorts. One of these six was Lady Anne Glenconner, then known as Lady Anne Cooke. Their duties were twofold: to support the velvet ends of the queen’s long dresses and, at the same time, to dress in finery.

Lady Anne had her hair permed or curled to prepare for the occasion.

“My grandma thought I should have my hair curled. So I went to have my hair curled. I think the last time I had a curly hairstyle like that was during service. When I tied my hair up and let it down, I looked like a sheared sheep.”

“My hair was completely frizzy. I remember crying with grief and thinking, how am I going to be the queen’s companion, when I look so sexy with this hair?”


Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip

Queen Elizabeth was 26 at the time. He demanded that his debut be televised live. Some of the royal family’s tradition of this event goes back centuries, up to 900 years. But this time, as many people will have the opportunity to see this event, it has never happened before.

The television commentator described the festive London atmosphere of the day from the facade of Buckingham Palace. Not only in front of the palace there were crowds of cheering people on both sides of the path along which the queen would go. Several other commentators were posted at various locations along the way. Today’s program was broadcast live on television for seven hours.



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